Supplementing piano lessons with videos

Just a few years ago, the furthest thing from my mind would be to send videos to piano students between lessons. In the past, I had routinely e-mailed assignments for the coming week along with practicing suggestions. (This created an organized set of notes to track learning and progress)

Those were the old days, before the advent of Skyped piano instruction which changed my whole perspective and had ramifications for my traditional, in-person lessons.

With Skype, where occasional transmission issues during a busy network day could affect the flow of instruction, it was important to shoot off a video to make practicing directions crystal clear. Sometimes I would e-mail two short videos that reviewed warm-up technique, and focused on ways to learn a particular piece in baby steps.

For adult students just starting out and needing reinforcement, the videos were a perfect reminder of all that transpired during the lesson. (Both Skype and non-Skype)

Videotaping a lesson-in-progress, and extracting parts of it, with the camera aimed at my arms/hands/fingers was another valuable lesson supplement.

This past week, I decided to make a video for a new adult student, introducing her to repertoire she might want to explore. (She had taken lessons as a child and returned to the piano after a long interval.)

In planning this first video, I wanted to ascertain what pieces she “liked” so she could help shape her own musical journey. (Her preference was Classical style works)

I. The selections I previewed were from Faber’s Developing Artist series, though often, I drew on repertoire from diverse sources such as the Toronto Conservatory albums, and collections of Kabalevsky, Bartok, Gurlitt, etc. that had spirited and colorful pieces from beginner to more advanced levels.

II. In this instance, I sent an adult student the Beethoven “Tempest” Sonata (opening movement–first part)

To this point, he had lessons covering this material, which consisted of parceled-out practicing in baby steps. (also videotaped and sent to him)

In summary, sending out videos to enrich piano lessons has been a valuable teaching tool in my studio and others.

LINK:

Lesson-in-progress

Beethoven “Tempest” Sonata

About arioso7: Shirley Kirsten

International piano teacher by Skype, recording artist, composer, piano finder, freelance writer, film maker, story teller: Grad of the NYC HS of Performing Arts, Oberlin Conservatory, NYU (Master of Arts) Studies with Lillian Freundlich and Ena Bronstein; Master classes with Murray Perahia and Oxana Yablonskaya. Studios in BERKELEY and EL CERRITO, California; Member, Music Teachers Assoc. of California, MTAC; Distance learning and Skyped instruction with supplementary videos: SKYPE ID, shirleypiano1 Contact me at: shirley_kirsten@yahoo.com OR http://www.youtube.com/arioso7 or at FACEBOOK: Shirley Smith Kirsten, http://facebook.com /shirley.kirsten TWITTER: http://twitter.com/arioso7 Private fund-raising for non-profits as pianist--Public Speaking re: piano teaching and creative approaches
This entry was posted in Beethoven "Tempest" Sonata, Beethoven Sonata Op. 31 no 2, Beethoven Tempest sonata, No. 2, piano, piano instrruction, piano learning, piano lessons, piano teacher, repertoire for piano students, word press, word press.com, wordpress, you tube, you tube video, yout tube and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s