MTAC, music teachers association of california, piano blog, piano blogging, piano instruction, piano lessons by Face Time, piano lessons by Skype, piano teaching, Shirley Kirsten, Skype

SKYPE CALL RECORDER Playback views for Online Piano Lessons

The UNIVERSE of RECORDING ONLINE LESSONS IN PROGRESS

SKYPE CALL RECORDER

Skype Call Recorder

FACETIME CALL RECORDER

Face Time Call recorder crop recent

Claire and Face Time Record Box

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overhead and treble clef

My Newest Overhead Cam (72 inches high)

newest overhead 72%22

Still another upgrade: My Piano Room has TWO Overhead webcams in addition to a side view cam that’s mounted on a music stand.

my piano room best webcams recent
me under overhead cam

Overhead side view of Keyboard

overhead side view of piano

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MY PRESENTATION coming up at the MTAC STATE CONVENTION: July 1, 2016

FLASHBACK: As prep for my presentation to the Music Teachers Association (Alameda Branch) that took place on May 11, 2015, I’d gathered a series of exemplary SKYPE Lessons demonstrating the technology to best advantage: “Teaching Piano by Skype: Braving a High-Tech Universe.”

Alameda Branch presentation

This prep and more recent updates will encompass my program at the Statewide Music Teachers Association (MTAC) Convention in Los Angeles, taking place July 1, 2016.

My plan is to project blogs on a big screen that have have embedded you tube videos with various captions for multiple playback views via Skype Call Recorder and Face Time Recorder.

HOW I STARTED OUT before the technology expanded. Here I’m seated at my Steinway Upright teaching a student in Greece using the INTERNAL CAM of my iMac Computer.

early skype lessons--This one to Greece

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Example of webcam view choices: (I use the Logitech C920HD1080)

webcam listing

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The Direction and Effect of Lighting on the keyboard during Online lessons. (I use the overhead view in this example)

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The Details

When a student is watching his/her computer, she can see me in full screen, but as a lesson progresses, on my end I can RECORD the event using various views (LOCAL-me; REMOTE: the student; or SPLIT SCREEN-me and the student) These settings can be altered while a lesson is in progress without interruption. Changing views does not stop the recording process.

When I review and import the lesson footage to iMovie, I then upload it to You Tube and send the student a Lesson PLAYBACK with multiple keyboard views for increased pedagogical value.

Of particular value is the use of the Alzo Horizontal mount on a tripod to support an overhead keyboard view using an attached web cam.

My tutorial below refers to this particular overhead set up.

An Online teacher can also have addition web cam views by using a music stand as support, or he/she may mount a webcam on the end blocks of the piano. There are many possibilities to be explored.

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Overview of the equipment and Online transmission by Skype from Berkeley, California to rural North Carolina: SKYPE CALL RECORDER is activated on this playback video.

The attached video below explores a Skype lesson from Berkeley, California to Staten Island, New York showing the various webcam views in progress.

J.C. Bach Prelude in A minor

JC Bach p1

Page 2

p2Preludein A minor

A Preceding Technique Lesson Segment (A minor scale and Arpeggio)

Teaching supplements

These were Video recorded supplements for Gayle re: the theory and Harmonic Rhythm of J.C. Prelude in A minor. They are embedded in the attached blog:

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2015/03/20/weaving-theory-and-harmonic-rhythm-into-a-piano-lesson/

My Legato Pedaling segment included playing and naming A minor chords on each scale degree with an ear-training dimension, along with a harmonic Analysis of the first half of the J.C. Bach Prelude


This second segment examined part B with its string of Secondary Dominants:

About Gayle from Staten Island (She’s a transfer student with less than a preceding year of formal piano lessons)

A transplant from San Francisco to New York City (but originally from Chicago) Gayle made her first performance appearance in a SCREEN SHARE at our KICK-OFF SKYPE/LIVE piano recital. That meant she and all my piano students here and afar could watch Gayle in a pre-recorded segment. One other student, about to give birth did the same with Chopin’s C# minor Waltz thanks to the Miracle of Technology!

As it happened, I created Gayle’s video profile framing for her “Happiness” offering by Turk.

Gayle also made a transition from playing a digital piano, to acquiring a lovely Baldwin Acrosonic that was LANDED by FACE TIME, if you can believe!

Here’s how it played out from a first love meeting to marriage made in heaven (with my long distance matchmaker efforts)

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2014/12/06/the-argument-for-learning-piano-on-an-acoustic/

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OTHER video supplements, or TUTORIALS for ONLINE and LIVE Students

I will use the Quicktime Record applicationfor these tutorials. The selection of Keyboard views pertain. (Overhead, Side View, or Face Time: Mac Internal Face Time camera view)

In this video I demonstrate Staccato Parallel Thirds in the “Little Party,” La Petite Reunion by Burgmuller, Op. 100, No. 4. (I utilize the side keyboard view and the overhead for comparison)

Hand-Crossovers in a Domenico Scarlatti Sonata (Overhead keyboard view)

Scarlatti Sonata in A Major, K. 113

LINKS:

SKYPE/LIVE Student Piano RECITAL

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2015/03/16/a-skypelive-adult-piano-student-recital/

Multi-cam Views during Skype or Face Time Piano Lessons

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2014/01/26/multi-cam-views-during-skype-or-facetime-piano-lessons/

My Overhead Web Cam adds to my Online accouterments

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2014/11/05/my-new-overhead-web-cam-view-adds-fingering-clarity-and-choreography/

A North Carolina piano student by FaceTime talks about the ONLINE private lesson experience well before she visited me in Berkeley:

April feet

Sample Piano Lessons by FaceTime: From Berkeley CA, to North Carolina (Chopin Waltz in A minor Op. Posthumous)

LISTENING Through DECAYING NOTES

 

After the N. Carolina student had a LIVE piano lesson in Berkeley CA, she compared it to her ONLINE experience in the presence of another LIVE student. (Laura)

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2016/02/06/when-a-virtual-piano-student-becomes-a-reality/

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Creating a Seamless legato in G# minor Arpeggios (Split Screen view)

A Berkeley to North Carolina Online lesson segment followed by a lesson snatch to Edinburgh, Scotland (B minor scale in Contrary motion) In the first segment I use a split screen teacher overhead view; In the second, I use a full screen LOCAL Overhead cam Teacher view.

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The student from Scotland, recently IMPROVISED with her technology during a lesson when SKYPE and FACETIME had serious transmission issues. She came in on FACETIME through her iPhone.

REVIEWS of ONLINE lessons by other virtual students:

Sherry from Louisville, KY talks about her ONLINE lessons:

Marie, from Fresno, California talks about her Lessons on Face Time


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https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2015/04/05/piano-technique-stabilizing-tempo-presence-of-mind-and-breathing-through-scales-and-arpeggios/


Laura’s lesson segment (B minor scales) captured with webcam views of two pianos (Baldwin and Steinway grand)–I use my music stand that has easy rotation.

A more recent LIVE lesson in Berkeley uses webcam technology, recording the teacher and student in alternate sequence:

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2015/04/26/piano-technique-playing-scales-without-bumps-or-accents/

FOR HUMOR:

HUMOR! HOLD THE LH NOTES DOWN!

 

Earthquake Skype lesson video

Skype lesson/baby interruption (Alaska)

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2013/07/27/top-five-piano-by-skype-lesson-interruptions-videos/

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2014/02/09/piano-lessons-by-skype-a-fur-st-for-two-furrry-friends/

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2016/06/26/lights-camera-action-in-los-angeles/

"Tales of a Musical Journey", California Music Teacher Magazine, Irina Gorin, MTAC, music teachers association of california, playing piano, Shirley Kirsten, Shirley Smith Kirsten, word press, word press.com, wordpress, wordpress.com, you tube video, you tube.com, yout tube, youtube.com

Irina Gorin’s Tales of a Musical Journey is reviewed in the FALL 2012 Statewide MTAC Magazine

Here’s the link rather than copy/paste. The article is ONLINE!

The you tubes are nicely embedded within the writing.

http://www.mtac.org/cmt/CMT2012FallTalesMusicalJourney.pdf

Now the icing on the cake:

Irina needs to make the rounds to branches around the State to sell her stuff and give “live” presentations.

Keep the phone lines open!

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Piano Technique: Focusing on Rotation in arpeggios, and building up a scale (Videos)

These are two supplementary videos that I created for adult students between lessons. As previously mentioned, they clarify and reinforce the content of our class, and map out ways to practice.

I. ROTATION at the turnaround of a B minor Arpeggio

Exploring the curve at the very top of the figure with an energy boost to transition smoothly in the descent (legato and staccato playing in two dynamic ranges)

II. The roll-in, wrist forward motion when starting the arpeggio, or coming around in a sequence of playings

C Major Scale

I. Blocking (separate hands)–block out “tunnels” through which the thumb passes (D,E and then GAB with thumbs played softly in between)

II. Find common fingers and notes between the hands (such as 3’s on E and A) Same for common thumb points.

III. Scope out the “bridge” over the octave, B, C, D and note how the fingers of each hand are in “mirror” or reciprocal relationship with each other. (practice finding these “neighborhoods.”)

IV. Format the scale once internal relationships are explored (Practice legato to staccato)

Practice the scale with a singing-tone Mezzo Forte (and don’t forget curve around “rotation” at the top before the descent)

Two octaves, quarter notes
Two octaves, 8th notes, with wrist dips in pairs of notes
Three octaves, rolling triplets
Four octaves, 16ths (legato)
Four octaves 16ths staccato (Forte)–Staccato is “a snip away from legato.”
Four octaves 16ths staccato (piano)

LINK:

http://www.powhow.com/classes/shirley-kirsten

"Tales of a Musical Journey" by Irina Gorin, acoustic piano, arioso 7, blog, blogger, blogging, blogging about piano, blogs about piano, children's music, El Cerrito, El Cerrito California, El Cerrito piano instruction, El Cerrito piano studio, emotion in music, fingering and phrasing at the piano, fingering and piano technique, five finger positions at the piano, five finger warm-ups, Irina Gorin, Journal of a Piano Teacher from New York to California, Just Being at the Piano by Mildred Portney-Chase, legato playing at the piano, mental imagery, mindful piano practicing, mindful practicing, molto cantabile, MTAC, MTAC.org, New York City, New York City High School of Performing Arts, Oberlin, Oberlin Conservatory, pentascales, phrasing at the piano, pianist, piano, piano addict, piano blog, piano blogging, piano blogs, piano instruction, piano instructor, piano lesson, piano lessons, piano playing, piano playing and relaxation, piano practicing, piano studio in El Cerrito, piano study, piano teacher, piano teachers, piano teaching, piano world-wide, pianoaddict.com, pianoworld, pianoworld.com, playing five-finger positions, playing legato at the piano, playing piano, playing staccato, playing staccato at the piano, playing the piano, POWHOW, POWHOW instruction, POWHOW piano instruction, POWHOW.com, practicing a piece in 7 different emotions, practicing arpeggios, practicing piano, practicing piano with relaxation, publishers marketplace, publishersmarketplace, Rina, Rina 4 takes piano lessons, Rina takes piano lessons, rotation in piano playing, scales, shirley kirsten piano teacher in El Cerrito, Shirley Kirsten teaches classes at POWHOW, shirley s kirsten, Shirley Smith Kirsten, Skype a piano lesson to Australia, Skype piano lessons, slow mindful practicing, slow piano practicing, teaching piano to young children, teaching Rina piano, teachinig piano to young children, technique, word press, word press.com, wordpress, wordpress.com, you tube, you tube video, youtube.com

Growing piano technique in baby steps: Rina, 5, advances to hands together five-finger positions (adding in 10ths)

Rina may not know the words “pentascales” and “tenths,” but she has the intelligence to notice when her fingers move up and down together, playing the same notes an “octave” apart. With a sound knowledge of the music alphabet in both directions, she has good cognitive reinforcement. (She also knows “running notes” or 8ths, “long sounds”–half notes, “short sounds”– quarters, and “half-note dot” is a dotted-half note.)

But note-name recognition and having a concept of rhythmic values are just part of the learning process. She needs to cultivate the singing tone wedded to limpid phrasing–a dimension of playing we’ve explored from day one embracing Irina Gorin’s Tales of a Music Journey philosophy.

In this regard, Rina is working on softening the impact of her thumbs, so she can nicely roll into her LEGATO five-finger positions and smoothly taper them. (LEGATO means smooth and connected, finger-to-finger)

She has progressed from having played each hand alone through five notes ascending and descending, in a “conversational” way, to synchronizing both hands at the same time in parallel motion.

She also creates an “echo” effect on a repeat and we make sure to include the parallel minor in her playings. (Black notes also belong to the keyboard family)

Next, I thought to introduce a bit of “magic.”

How about starting the Right Hand on E while the Left Hand remained on bass C. (still five notes up and down but spaced in 10ths)

Rina took to it like a duck in water especially with an enticing harmonic landscape.

Here are two snatches from her lesson, starting with the first (both hands playing same notes in legato)

In the second video, she plays in 10ths:

Our next piece is “Little March” by Daniel Gottlob Turk. This follows Minuet by Reinagle of which Rina is separately studying the bass part. In addition she’s rendering it in the “minor,” enlisting a “B flat.” (She performed the melody on our recent Spring Recital) The Reinagle piece came with its own new landmark: Rina played detached and legato notes in one selection.

I’ve prepared a video to assist mom with ear-training experiences for “Little March” during the week. Rina will be saturated with listening; doing hand signals for melodic shape; singing notes and then rhythms. (phrase one) This is the first stage of her learning process.

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LINK:

Rina plays at the Spring Recital


https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2012/05/05/rina-5-performs-at-our-spring-recital-after-8-months-of-piano-lessons-video/

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Piano Instruction: Part FIVE, Beethoven’s “Tempest” Sonata, Op. 31 no. 2 Measures 93 to 158 (Development, Recitative, submerged pedal)

This is a hauntingly beautiful section of the first movement.

After the composer has devoted so many preceding measures to the key of A minor, he decides to travel at quick intervals through a series of different keys. Such fast-paced modulations occur primarily with the return of the crossed-hands portion of the piece, beginning in F# minor at double forte level. (FF) (measure 99)

But before we get to this intensified point, Beethoven re-introduces a Largo, following the SECOND ENDING, which draws on the opening broken chord ROLL. The harmonies through which he passes are quite mystical. (especially when a D Major rolled-out chord is followed by a diminished one starting on B#) The third and final rolled chord in F# evokes the gates of heaven opening. At this point, the player must experience a divine revelation so he can communicate it convincingly to the listener.

The same mysticism blankets a Recitative, measures 144-148; and 155-158 with a submerged sustain pedal which is in itself, an innovative harmonic event in a Classical period sonata.

In fact, the “Tempest” is a ground-breaking composition just because the composer explores new tonal and harmonic regions while expanding beyond conservative form boundaries.

My video instruction elaborates upon this commentary:

LINKS:

Part ONE: Beethoven Tempest Sonata in D minor

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2012/04/01/practicing-tips-for-beethovens-tempest-sonata-op-31-no-2-part-one-video/

Part TWO Instruction

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2012/04/01/piano-instuction-part-two-beethovens-tempest-sonata-hand-cross-over-with-tremolo-in-the-middle-voice/

Part THREE Instruction

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2012/04/03/piano-instruction-part-three-beethoven-tempest-sonata-in-d-minor-op-31-no-2/

Part FOUR Instruction

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2012/04/04/piano-instruction-part-four-beethovens-tempest-sonata-in-d-minor-op-31-no-2-measures-55-93/

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Piano Instruction: How to practice Variation 2, Mozart Sonata No. 11 in A, K. 331 (Videos)

The biggest challenge in this particular variation is the fast-paced tempo and ornament execution–not to mention the fleeting 4 against 3 relationship of treble 32nds above 16ths in the bass. But the latter, should not be a big concern considering how quickly everything spins by.

In the video instruction I suggest a step-wise practicing routine where the left hand is blocked in groups of three, tracking common tones and those that move.

Fingering is very critical in playing Variation 2 smoothly, so I have attached my recommendations, subject to modification depending on what is easiest for the player. I don’t think finger choices are set in stone.

As to character, this variant has the droll dimension due to the dissonant 1/2-steps rolling through it in the bass, (the D#, E redundancy, for example) and the prominent 8th note half-step bass line grace notes which are fleshed out in Forte measures.

Variation 2 definitely reflects Mozart’s lighthearted personality.

REMINDER: Slow practicing is the gateway to a happy long-range result. (Re: the ornaments, practice them slowly, and start on the upper neighbor of principal note)
For some players, depending on level and ability, a turn will be adequate. For others, try for more repercussions.

Close-up view– no repeats–for supple wrist motion and relaxed elbow swing out…

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Irina Morozova’s inspiring words flow through a lesson with an adult student (Beethoven’s Fur Elise-in-progress) Video

“From watching great pianists it is obvious that they incorporate quite different movements to achieve the same goals, because people do not play piano with fingers but rather with the mind and the ear. Again, it is the clear image of what kind of sound one wants to achieve, combined with the knowledge of how to get it….”

To frame a lesson with these ideas, helps to infuse it with the spiritual, analytical, and nonverbal elements of exchange.

Within this paradigm, one of my adult students continued her study of Beethoven’s “Fur Elise.” (C section, treble chord voicing with bass tremolo)

LINK:

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2012/03/17/pianist-irina-morozova-blends-a-satisfying-career-of-teaching-and-performing-videos/