Shirley Kirsten, Shirley Smith Kirsten, Steinway, Steinway model 1098 for sale, Steinway piano, Steinway piano model 1098, Steinway studio upright

My singing Steinway studio upright is a parting sorrow

Steinway upright dolled up

It hasn’t left Berkeley yet, but I’m sure my second singing nightingale will in time find the right owner. I’ve down-sized since my recent move–going from 3,000 sq feet, to 1500 to 700. Might as well live in a Pod.

Most readers and You Tubers watched me demonstrate for my students on the upright, as the camera was aimed straight at me–and once the piano made history when I briefly fell asleep during a “Fur Elise” lesson, nearly bonking my nose against the rack rim.

But most memories have been bundled in musical warmth and gratitude.

The Steinway beauty, inside and out, is a model 1098 manufactured in 1992. It has a wealth of resonance, added to an even, smooth “feel” across the keyboard.

May it live forever in the heart of its future caretaker, bringing musical love and joy to a new household.

On display:

Beethoven “Fur Elise”


John Peters, Registered Piano Technician comments on the upright:

shirley_kirsten@yahoo.com

serial number 524279

hammers and pins view

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The premier piano “haus” on W. 58th!

Guggenheim white Steinway B Klavierhaus

The high point of my trip to NYC was inhabiting a paradise of pianos on “piano row.” That’s what they call “West 58th” between Broadway and 7th Avenue.

In the imposing shadow of Carnegie Hall that envelops the neighborhood, Klavierhaus manages to retain its unique character amidst a glut of piano restorers such as Beethovens and Faust/Harrison.

(I made a visit to Beethovens that will be covered in a separate posting)

For me, Klavierhaus was indeed center stage from the moment I entered its sanctuary.

Greeted by an eye-catching, Pleyel, circa 1890, I sampled its delicious tone and impeccably even feel from note to note. Perfection to a tee permeated its DNA–In fact, the restoration was an historic journey with a keen awareness of what European materials were used at its inception. Jeremy Denk, concert pianist, had videotaped a riveting exchange with Gabor Reisinger, President of Klavierhaus about the care invested in bringing this instrument to exceptional playing standard. It was more than a miracle of fate, but instead, an artistic and historically authentic undertaking.

In the course of my meanderings through Klavierhaus with the assistance of Jeffrey Baker,(Business Dev. Director and Concert technician) I was impressed by more than a dozen pianos that were each developed to their full potential. No detail of maintenance was left behind.

This is not a common state of the art in most piano establishments. In too many, the instruments may have a basically appealing tone, but regulation and other problems abound that are sadly ignored–most likely for financial reasons.

The ever-looming profit motive compromises the needs of pianists who desire a lifelong compatible musical companion in the present minus a future promise of satisfactory, tailor-made “voicing” and “regulation”

(I’d encountered this in-the-next-life, promotional mantra many years ago when I was looking for a Steinway to replace a damaged one) Most pianos sampled at dealerships were “cottonballs,” without heart-throbbing, immediate tonal appeal.

NOT the “case” at Klavierhaus.

What I heard and experienced hands-on was the golden glow of piano paradise in the here and now without the promise of a honey-dipped afterlife.

And speaking of other-worldly environs, one particularly extraordinary piano captured my attention: It was a shimmering white Steinway in a gorgeous art case that’s best experienced by viewing my on-site video. (Excuse the shaky camera–I was very titillated to the point of tremulousness, not having a bulky tripod to steady me)

In truth, the following three videos in “a row” exemplify the outstanding work of Gabor and his team of tuner/technicians/salespeople who immaculately prepare and showcase these beautiful instruments.

First the lusciously mellow gift that Guggenheim gave to his wife on Valentine’s Day:

Next, a 9-foot Fazioli (Angela Hewitt’s favored piano)

Finally, more Pleyel-dipping, followed by a Bechstein sampling, and visit to the Klavierhaus Recital Hall


LINK:

KLAVIERHAUS
211 W. 58th Street
New York, NY 10019
(The north side of West 58th Street between Broadway and Seventh Avenue)

http://www.klavierhaus.com


OTHER: My visit to Beethoven Pianos on W. 58th Street

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2013/06/04/beethoven-piano-store-on-w-58th-is-a-treasure-of-restored-pianos-and-new-ones-too/