Drawing room sonata, K.545, Mozart, Mozart piano sonata, Mozart piano sonata K. 545, piano, piano blog, piano blogging, piano sonata, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Would Mozart believe he was “banned” worldwide?!

Mozart

I thought it would never happen! An instant banishment from cyber-space! Mozart’s beloved Andante from Sonata K. 283 was the victim of pure and simple tyranny by the you tube police! The stand-in argonaut imperialist Hyperion, a recording company whose reach extended above and beyond PUBLIC DOMAIN, wrenched my upload from its earthly existence with a bundled threat to annihilate my Google Plus fueled Channel.

Should I be specific and name, Names? I’m sure the well-known pianist, who is one of hundreds to record the precious Mozart middle movement, had nothing to do with the iron fist of Hyperion, though I was made aware that his identity was woven into the plot to kill my posting. Perhaps he was innocently caught in the middle of a copyright infringement charge leveled at me, having no rhyme or reason to snatch my version of Mozart’s precious middle movement.

With a knee-jerk empowering reflex, I “disputed” the ban, checking pertinent boxes with an added typed footnote defending my right to play a dead composer’s creation that dated back to the 18th century. I reserved the RIGHT TO CLAIM that my posting had educational value, not redeemable in $$$…

***

With satire put aside, scores of you tubing musicians are up in arms, rallying against prohibitions imposed on our Classical music uploads–We’re appalled at corporate ownership claims of long deceased composers. It’s basically a Citizen’s United crossover into the musical universe with the Corporate Recording INDUSTRIAL Complex (CRIC) using BRUTE FORCE to rid cyber of Indies, viewed as a threat to the MONOPOLIZING OLIGARCHY!

(DO I SOUND LIKE BERNIE SANDERS??! Who cares? He’s got my vote!)

Enough said.

My Online delivered defense against HYPERION’S CHARGES elicited a YOU TUBE channeled withdrawal of the world-wide ban.

In its place, a captioned “Disputed third party matched content” was affixed.

In conclusion, Regardless of bullying Big MONEY interests, musicians the world over won’t capitulate.

By example, I just posted another Mozart middle movement that narrowly escaped the Ban. So there!

UPDATE: November 10, 2105 at 8:38 a.m.
Screen Shot 2015-11-10 at 8.35.30 AM

Hi Shirley Kirsten,
Good news! Your dispute wasn’t reviewed within 30 days, so the copyright claim on your YouTube video has now been released.
Video title: “(HD) W.A. Mozart Sonata No. 5 in G, K. 283, Andante, movement 2”
– The YouTube Team

adult piano instruction, Classical era sonatas, classical music, Classical music blog, K. 283, Mozart, Mozart Sonata No. 5 K. 283, Mozart Sonatas, piano blog, piano blogging, piano instruction, piano lessons, Shirley Kirsten, W.A. Mozart

Exploring Mozart Sonata No. 5 in G, K. 283 (First movement, Allegro)

The learning exchange between student and teacher is heightened when a new piece is introduced. In the case of Mozart’s charming, early period Sonata no. 5 in G, it became a revisit for me that brought new revelations that I shared during the course of weekly lessons.

***

Mozart presents a challenge in capturing a singing tone that is emblematic of the opera. (From Wiki: “The work was written down during the visit Mozart paid to Munich for the production of his La finta giardiniera from late 1774 to the beginning of the following March.”)

At least when playing the opening allegro of K.283, even the Forte-pianos (f-ps), that might suggest more abrupt and decisive accents in Beethoven’s mid-period sonatas, are far more elegantly played in Mozart’s early sonata vocabulary so one should be able to sing them.

Bass notes in a parallel octave progression moving in an intensifying fashion seem to be yielding to those doubled in the treble, lest they sound too ponderous for the period. Therefore, one must respect a fine line of sensitivity in their execution.

Pianist, Murray Perahia speaks of the singing pulse in Mozart works, and I must agree. He states that a rubato lives within the composer’s music but not necessarily taken with such liberty as would apply to Chopin and the Romantics.

Finally, in my tutorial, I try to apply educated instincts and intuition to my exploration of the opening Allegro, K.283, with a focus on the singing tone, phrasing, harmonic rhythm and form.

The Exposition is naturally a springboard for my analysis of the whole movement that weaves in motivic and harmonic tie-ins.

Mozart Sonata K283 p. 1 Allegro 1

Mozart Sonata K283 p. 2 Allegro

Play Through:

Instruction:

From Wiki

“Piano Sonata No. 5 (Mozart)

“Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Piano Sonata No. 5 in G major, K 283 (189h) (1774) is a piano sonata in three movements:

Allegro
Andante
Presto

“This sonata is part of the earliest group of sonatas that Mozart published in the mid-1770s. The first movement is a sonata-allegro movement that is concise, with an economy of materials. The development section is a mere 18 measures long. The shorter length and moderate technical demands make it an ideal piece for early-advanced study and performance.

“A typical performance takes twelve to eighteen (Richter) minutes.”

acoustic piano, Classical music blog, digital piano, piano blog, piano playing

Mozart played on an acoustic and digital piano

If an acoustic piano is well-voiced and regulated, one can attempt to make a timbre and touch comparison with a “hammer-weighted” digital piano by playing a side-by-side excerpt from the repertoire. In this instance, my Steinway grand is in the process of undergoing hammer filing and regulation, so the two instruments are not perhaps justly comparative. Still, it’s instructive to hear tonal differences between the two, and decide which is more appealing for listeners. (Note the tempos taken are slightly different)

Steinway M grand, 1917

Yamaha Arius YDP 141

LINK:

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2014/12/06/the-argument-for-learning-piano-on-an-acoustic/

classissima.com, Mozart, Mozart Sonata no. 16 K. 545, piano, piano lesson, piano lessons, piano teaching, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, you tube, you tube.com, youtube, youtube.com

Piano Instruction: Mozart Sonata No. 16 in C Major, K. 545, Allegro (updated Video)

Play through

p 1 Mozart k 545

p 2, K. 545

p 3 Mozart k 545_NEW

p 4 Mozart k 545

p. 5 Mozart K 545_NEW

arpeggios, Circle of Fifths, classical music, Classical period sonata, Creative Fresno, El Cerrito, El Cerrito California, El Cerrito piano studio, Exposition in piano sonata, five finger positions, five finger warm-ups, Fresno, Fresno California, Fresno Famous, keyboard technique, Mozart, Mozart sonata in C K545, MTAC, music, music and heart, music history, music teachers association of california, Music Teachers Asssociation of California, musicology, my space, New York City High School of Performing Arts, Oberlin Conservatory, New York City High School of Performing Arts, pentachords, pianist, piano, piano addict, piano finding, piano instruction, piano lesson, piano pedagogy, piano room, Piano Street, piano student, piano teacher, piano teaching repertoire, piano tutorial, piano warm-ups, Piano World, Pianostreet.com, pianoworld, pianoworld.com, Rondo form, Shirley Kirsten blog, Shirley Smith Kirsten, Steinway and Sons, Steinway grand piano, Steinway piano, talkclassical.com, technique, used piano, video performances, word press, wordpress.com, you tube, you tube video

Mozart Rondo: Allegretto K. 545, Performance and Analysis

Performance:

Analysis:

The Rondo, more often than not, is the form used in the last movement of a Classical era Sonata. (The Classical period roughly encompasses the years between 1750 and 1830) The Rondo is usually a brisk, lively and energetic movement that brings a sonata to a definitive conclusion. It is in the home key of the piece.

In the Sonata, K. 545, Mozart composes a light-hearted final (third) movement evocative of the Opera Buffa, or comic opera.

Form: A B A C A Coda

The “A” section, or Rondo in the bright C Major tonality, with a two eighth note short upbeat to a slightly more prolonged 8th note downbeat is the basic motif of the movement, and will come back interspersed with a B and a C section. The “B” section is in the Dominant key of G Major, while the “C” section goes into the Relative minor ( A minor) This A minor section has a Development-like character, and is more prolonged as it delightfully meanders and then winds its way back to the Rondo “A” section that is in the home key of C Major.

In the A minor or “C” section, Mozart uses an inversion of thirds to 6ths, and dances from one hand to the other, with inverted counterpoint. (He flips over the voices, so that the listener experiences the motif or Rondo idea in the bass range, with a 16th decoration in the Treble and in reverse) The devices of inverted intervals and inverted counterpoint are significant characteristics of this “C” section of the final movement.

Through a pivot chord, using A minor, as a double identity Vi chord in C Major going to its Dominant, G B D, the movement weaves its way back to the “A” section Rondo in C Major followed by a Coda (added concluding section) using Dominant and Tonic progressions in broken chord fashion to the very last splash of articulated, unisons that bring the movement to a resounding, and definitive ending. At the end of this work, I feel like I’m in the orchestra pit, conducting those last measures as the curtain goes down in the opera.

Feedback is always appreciated. If you have ideas to share about this effervescent movement, please post.

Links to Piano Instruction first movement (in three parts)

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2010/12/29/piano-instruction-harmonic-rhythm-and-phrasing-part-1-mozart-sonata-in-c-k-545/

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2010/12/29/piano-instruction-part-two-harmonic-rhythm-and-phrasing-mozart-sonata-in-c-k-545/

Second movement, Analysis and Instruction:

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2011/01/07/piano-instruction-second-movement-mozart-sonata-in-c-major-k-545-video/

Mozart, Mozart sonata in C K545, Mr. York, Murray Perahia, music, music history, New York City High School of Performing Arts, Oberlin Conservatory, New York City High School of Performing Arts, pianist, piano, piano instruction, piano lesson, piano pedagogoy, piano society, Piano Street, piano student, piano teacher, piano technique, piano tuner, Uncategorized

Piano Instruction: Part two, Harmonic Rhythm and Phrasing, Mozart Sonata in C, K.545

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u00VjBtn-t0    (Part 1)

This part 2 segment explores the second theme of the Mozart Sonata K.  545, first movement, which concludes the Exposition.

Classical era, El Cerrito, El Cerrito California, Fresno, Fresno California, Fresno miniseries, Irwin Freundlich, Lillian Freundlich, MTAC, music, music history, New York City High School of Performing Arts, Oberlin Conservatory, New York City High School of Performing Arts, piano instruction, piano lesson, piano pedagogoy, piano scales, piano student, piano teacher, Piano World, pianoaddict.com, Pianostreet.com, pianoworld, pianoworld.com, scales, Shirley Kirsten, Shirley Kirsten blog, Steinway and Sons, Steinway piano, talkclassical.com, Teach Street, technique, uk-piano-forums, Uncategorized, word press, wordpress.com, you tube, you tube video

Piano Instruction: Part one, Harmonic Rhythm and Phrasing, Mozart Sonata in C, K. 545, Shirley Kirsten, Piano

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8cBg_qKSeU  (Part 2)

The attached video contains the first part of a tutorial on the subject of Harmonic Rhythm and Phrasing as applies to Mozart’s popular “drawing room” sonata in C, K. 545. (First Theme) I will be uploading part two which will continue analysis through completion of the Exposition. (first and second theme statements) Part 3 will follow from the Development section to the composition’s conclusion.

The discussion and demonstration in this video circumscribe how to interpret or shape phrases in relation to underlying harmonic movement. I show by example how certain chords “resolve” down to others, and in acquiring awareness of these resolutions, melodic shaping is clarified.

Without getting too bogged down in the theory side of musical analysis, I think the student can develop enough of a trained ear to be sensitive to relationships between chords, and how this awareness can assist with overall interpretation and nuances of phrasing.

Part II, continues through the second theme. Although I have already recorded this segment, the total presentation posed length problems, and for one sitting it may have been too much to absorb.

Feedback is always appreciated.

See Part 2  Video: Mozart Sonata K. 545, Harmonic Rhythm/Phrasing

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2010/12/29/piano-instruction-part-two-harmonic-rhythm-and-phrasing-mozart-sonata-in-c-k-545/