counterpoint, diminished chords, El Cerrito, El Cerrito California, imitative counterpoint, J.S. Bach, J.S. Bach Invention 8 in F Major BWV779, J.S. Bach two part Inventions, Johann Sebastian Bach, JS Bach, mind body connection, mindful piano practicing, piano instruction, piano lessons, piano teacher, piano teaching, piano technique, piano tutorial, pianoaddict.com, Pianostreet.com, pianoworld, pianoworld.com, playing piano, Shirley Kirsten, Shirley Kirsten blog, Shirley Smith Kirsten, slow mindful practicing, slow piano practicing, talkclassical.com, Teach Street, teaching piano, word press, wordpress.com, you tube, you tube video

Piano Instruction: J.S. Bach Invention no. 8 in F, BWV 779, using a spring forward wrist and hand rotation, Two Videos

I introduced my tutorial by playing a snatch from Edna-Mae Burnam’s Dozen a Day, Book 1, no. 3 “Hopping.” It was the springboard for the wrist motion I use when playing Invention 8 in F Major.

I also enlist a hand rotation for a stream of 16ths in descending sequence, measures 4-6, and wherever else this configuration occurs in the course of the composition.

The Subject or main idea of Invention 8 is explored in a separate hands, slow practice approach, and I include the devices Bach employs in the Development section on p. 2. The counterpoint or dialog and overlap of voices are fleshed out in my final playing in tempo.

I had previously rendered the Invention at a slower speed, but preferred a brisker tempo.

Tutorial:

***

***

RELATED:

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2011/09/10/revisiting-j-s-bachs-invention-1-in-c-bwv-772-video/

Beethoven, Beethoven Moonlight Sonata, blog, blogger, blogging, Circle of Fifths, Classical era, Classical period sonata, classissima, classissima.com, composers, Creative Fresno, diminished chords, El Cerrito, El Cerrito California, El Cerrito piano studio, Fresno California, fresno filmmakers alliance, keyboard technique, MTAC, music, music and heart, music teachers association of california, New York City High School of Performing Arts, New York University, Oberlin Conservatory, pianist, piano, piano addict, piano instruction, piano instructor, piano lesson, piano lessons, piano pedagogy, piano society, Piano Street, piano teacher, piano teaching repertoire, piano tutorial, pianoworld, pianoworld.com, playing piano, presto agitato from Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata, publishers marketplace, publishersmarketplace.com, Shirley Kirsten, Shirley Kirsten blog, Shirley Smith Kirsten, Steinway M grand piano, talkclassical.com, Teach Street, Timothy Gallwey, video performances, you tube, you tube video

Piano Instruction: Spot Practicing, Presto Agitato movement 3, Beethoven’s “Moonlight” Sonata

Beethoven’s C# minor Sonata, Op. 27, No. 2, the “Moonlight”)

RELATED:
https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2011/04/03/piano-instruction-out-of-a-rut-with-spot-practicing/

arpeggios, athletic coaching, athletic training, authorsden, Baroque music, Bay area, California, classical music, classissima.com, counterpoint, Creative Fresno, crossed hands, diminished 7th arpeggios, diminished 7th chords, diminished chords, Domenico Scarlatti, El Cerrito, El Cerrito California, El Cerrito piano studio, Elaine Comparone, essercizi, Facebook, five finger positions, five finger warm-ups, Fresno, Fresno California, Fresno Famous, fresno filmmakers alliance, gymnastics, harpsichord, keyboard technique, Major and minor scales, mind body connection, music, music and heart, music teachers association of california, Music Teachers Asssociation of California, musicology, New York City High School of Performing Arts, Northwest Fresno, Oberlin Conservatory, Oberlin Conservatory, New York City High School of Performing Arts, ornaments, pianist, piano, piano addict, piano instruction, piano lesson, piano society, Piano Street, piano student, piano teacher, piano technique, piano warm-ups, Piano World, pianoaddict.com, Pianostreet.com, publishers marketplace, publishersmarketplace.com, pyrotechnical exercises, Ralph Kirkpatrick, repeated notes, scales, Scarlatti, Scarlatti Sonatas, Shirley Kirsten, Shirley Kirsten blog, Shirley Smith Kirsten, talkclassical.com, technique, Theory, trills, uk-piano-forums, whole body music listening, word press, wordpress.com, you tube, you tube video

Domenico Scarlatti Sonata (Toccata) in D minor, K. 141 with reams of repeated notes (VIDEO)

Domenico Scarlatti never fails to come up with a flashy pyrotechnical escapade that can make or break a player in progress. I know, because I’ve walked the plank with this piece until I was able to reverse my fortune and run with it happily into the horizon. Any number of times those repeated notes, cross hands, whatever, ruled me like a slave, and I had to earn my freedom with a commitment to slow and steady practice. Still, I would never be satisfied with the end result. That’s the way it is with an art form. You really never arrive, but just approach a goal with more success than expected.

How to stack the odds in your favor:

FIRST PRACTICE SEPARATE hands, very slowly. (use RH fingers 3,2,1, 3, 2, 1) except in measure 10: 1,3,2,1,2,1 Know the Harmonic progressions in the BASS.. Label all the secondary dominants, and notice their sequential pattern.

When played in tempo, the repeated notes should be executed in groups of ONE and not THREE. It goes so fast at Presto speed, that anyone daring to take it on better think in circles and not squares. And I mean that literally. Don’t forget to breathe and think slowly through fast paced 16th notes. Opposites attract.

Think flamenco guitar, vibrant Spanish rhythms and you’re off to a flying start. Most of all, ENJOY the passion of this masterpiece and let it SOAR!!

RELATED:
https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2010/11/27/trills/

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2011/02/18/domenico-scarlatti-sonata-in-a-k-113-i-found-another-pair-of-hands-video/

arpeggios, athletic coaching, athletic training, authorsden, Bay area, California, children's music, Circle of Fifths, classical music, counterpoint, Creative Fresno, diminished 7th arpeggios, diminished 7th chords, diminished chords, El Cerrito, El Cerrito California, El Cerrito piano studio, Facebook, five finger positions, five finger warm-ups, Fresno, Fresno California, Fresno Famous, gymnastics, humor, JS Bach, keyboard technique, Lillian Freundlich, mind body connection, MTAC, music appreciation classes, Music Teachers Asssociation of California, musicology, my space, New York City High School of Performing Arts, pianist, piano, piano addict, piano instruction, piano lesson, piano pedagogy, piano society, Piano Street, piano student, piano teacher, piano teaching repertoire, piano technique, piano tutorial, piano warm-ups, Piano World, pianoaddict.com, Pianostreet.com, pianoworld, pianoworld.com, ping pong, ping pong balls, publishers marketplace, publishersmarketplace.com, scales, Shirley Kirsten, Shirley Kirsten blog, Shirley Smith Kirsten, Steinway and Sons, Steinway grand piano, Steinway M grand piano, Steinway piano, Steinway studio upright, talkclassical.com, Teach Street, technique, Theory, trills, uk-piano-forums, Uncategorized, video performances, whole body music listening, word press, wordpress.com, you tube, you tube video

Piano Lesson: Step by step Diminished 7th arpeggio warm-up with a 10 yr. old student

I previously discussed diminished 7th chords and how they are constructed as an introduction to an actual warm-up routine. The missing ingredient was the student:

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2011/01/19/piano-instruction-playing-diminished-7th-chords-and-arpeggios-video/

In this video, a ten year old pupil fills the bill, romping over the keyboard, joining in a scintillating choreography with her teacher:

Diminished 7th arpeggio sampled: G# B D F

1)Played in open position with resolutions to MAJOR and parallel minor chords
LH–5,3,2,1 RH 1, 2, 3, 5
Parallel and contrary motion routines.

2)Practiced across the keyboard in parallel motion with rhythmic build-up:
G#,B,D,F etc

RH 2 1 2 3 4 etc Arpeggio ends in RH with finger 4
LH 4 3 2 1 4 Arpeggio ends in LH with finger 3 (or optional, 2)

quarters, 3 octaves legato=smooth and connected
8th notes, 3 octaves legato
16th notes 4 octaves legato
staccato 16ths, loud and soft

Advanced students might add 32nds, legato/staccato

Next played in 10ths
Left Hand remains in root position starting on G#
4, 3, 2, 1, 4 etc.
Right Hand starts on B–finger no. 1

B D F G# B etc.
1 2 3 4 1 At the end of arpeggio RH has open position fingers: 1,2,3,4,5
B D F G# B

Same rhythmic build-up applies as in root position, parallel motion

Advanced students can add 32nds, legato/staccato

Dynamics can vary according to instructor’s direction.
Advise lighter approach on faster note values.

RELATED:
https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2011/01/12/piano-instruction-five-finger-warm-ups-in-major-and-minor-video/

https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2010/12/17/piano-gym-routines-with-my-10-year-old-student/

.

American Cancer Society Discovery Shop, arpeggios, athletic training, Bay area, California, cd baby, cdbaby, Classical era, classical music, diminished chords, El Cerrito, El Cerrito California, Facebook, five finger positions, five finger warm-ups, Fresno, Fresno California, Fresno Famous, gymnastics, music teachers association, music teachers association of california, my space, pianist, piano, piano pedagogy, piano scales, piano technique, piano tutorial, piano warm-ups, Piano World, pianoaddict.com, Pianostreet.com, pianoworld, pianoworld.com, ping pong, ping pong balls, pyrotechnical exercises, scales, Shirley Kirsten, Shirley Kirsten blog, Shirley Smith Kirsten, Steinway and Sons, Steinway M grand piano, Steinway piano, talkclassical.com, Teach Street, technique, Theory, Uncategorized, word press, wordpress.com, you tube, you tube video

Piano Instruction: Playing Diminished 7th chords and arpeggios (Video)

In order to understand how a diminished chord is formed a student needs to know the difference between a Major and minor third.

A Major third has two consecutive whole steps from a starting note so for example, C to E creates a Major third. If a student sings C to D to E, he will have started the song “Do a Deer” from the “Sound of Music.” If the E is lowered to Eb, and the student now sings C to D to Eb, he will sing what sounds like Do a sad deer. C to D to Eb creates a minor third between C and Eb. Minor is more somber than Major.

To be more analytical about the difference between a Major and minor third:
A Major third has two consecutive whole steps, measured from the starting note.
A minor third has a Whole step followed by a half step, measured from the starting note.

A Diminished chord has two consecutive minor thirds
If you are in the Key of C Major and you play a chord on each scale degree, when you arrive on the seventh note “B” of the scale, and build two skips on top of B, you will have a naturally occurring diminished chord: B D F. From B to D is a minor third, and from D to F is another minor third.

More often than not, diminished chords appear with still another minor third added on, which makes a diminished 7th chord:

B D F Ab (Ab is the 7th)

In the embedded video I demonstrate this particular diminished 7th chord played in open position (no thumb shifts) as a warm-up before playing an extended diminished 7th arpeggio (broken chord) across the keyboard.

For Open position practice:

B D F Ab
1 2 3 5 (Right Hand)
5 3 2 1 (Left Hand)

Practice in Parallel motion:
Quarter notes to 8th notes, to two sets of triplet 8ths, to four times triplet 16ths–one set legato, followed by a set staccato, and still another set played soft staccato.

The same is practiced in contrary motion.

For resolutions of the diminished chord.. Resolve B D F Ab to C E G (Major triad)
Then resolve B D F Ab to C Eb G (parallel minor triad)

Continue by playing across the keyboard in parallel motion. Always begin by practicing separate hands.

Fingering

B D F Ab B D F Ab B etc.

RH 1, 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 etc

LH 5 4 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 etc

Except for the very beginning and end of the diminished 7th arpeggio, the thumbs meet on B.

Rhythms:
quarters, three octaves
8ths, three octaves
16ths four octaves
32nds four octaves
32nds four octaves (staccato)

You can vary dynamic levels. Play mezzo forte for quarters and 8ths, Mezzo piano for 16ths and 32nds. etc.

More Technique related videos:
https://arioso7.wordpress.com/2010/12/31/piano-technique-related-videos/

Apple iPhone, authorsden, Bay area, California, children's music, Children's pieces, Classical era, classical music, Classical sonatina, Clowns by Kabalevsky, counterpoint, Creative Fresno, diminished 7th arpeggios, diminished 7th chords, diminished chords, El Cerrito, El Cerrito California, El Cerrito piano studio, Faber Primer Piano Adventures, Fig Garden Village, five finger positions, five finger warm-ups, Fresno, Fresno California, great pianists, humor, Internet, iPhone, Kabalevsky, Kabalevsky Op. 39 Children's pieces, keyboard technique, Latour, Lillian Freundlich, MTAC, music, music and heart, music teachers association of california, Music Teachers Asssociation of California, musicology, New York City High School of Performing Arts, Northwest Fresno, Oberlin Conservatory, New York City High School of Performing Arts, pianist, piano, piano addict, piano lesson, piano maintenance, piano pedagogy, piano scales, piano society, Piano Street, piano student, piano teacher, piano teaching repertoire, piano technique, piano tutorial, piano warm-ups, Piano World, pianoworld, pianoworld.com, publishers marketplace, publishersmarketplace.com, scales, Shirley Kirsten blog, Shirley Smith Kirsten, sonatina, Steinway M grand piano, Steinway piano, talkclassical.com, technique, uk-piano-forums, video performances, word press, wordpress.com, you tube, you tube video

A Day in El Cerrito and my return to Fresno

An awesome view from my piano studio in the East Bay

At 6:50 a.m. Monday morning, I climbed aboard Amtrak 711, destination Richmond, on the way to my El Cerrito piano studio in the East Bay.

The weekly trip north was a welcome breather from the tedium of Fresno’s blazing hot sun, 90  degree plus temps into the fall season, and an insalubrious haze over the city.

The good news was that once comfortably seated on the train, I completely forgot the Central Valley and looked forward to a ride with my two traveling buddies, Jim and Jose.

Jim, nearing 60, had a cherubic face and an impish smile. A repository of information, he was a web consultant for a well known, top of the line retailer. Often, during the course of our trip, he excused himself for a couple of minutes to complete a status report, or to reply to his boss via instant message. A hearty fellow with an engineering background and flair for technology, he came equipped with an iPhone and a state of the art Toshiba lap top.

If you asked Jim any technical or scientific question, he was an amazing compendium of information, like a traveling Wikipedia.

One time, Jose asked Jim about microwave cooking and if the rays negatively affected a food’s nutritional value, to which Jim gave him a symposium on ionizing radiation and various levels from safe to unsafe, etc. It was equal to a Physics lecture given at an ivy league college.

Jim also liked to banter about the economy. He dispensed his meticulously detailed descriptions of the financial market, speckled with raw data that would add brain convolutions to novices like myself. If Jim got going on California’s economy, he’d advise residents to bail out and run like the dickens to another state.

Jose was a good listener. An economist in his 40s, originally from Venezuela, he worked for a spice company in Northern California. His stay on Amtrak was briefer than Jim’s since he departed at Stockton and took an awaiting bus to Sacramento.

I enjoyed Jose’s international political perspective and his analysis of countries that had stable as well as failing economies. He could be as convincing as Jim in his own area of expertise.

I sat comfortably beside my two traveling companions offering a totally different perspective on life and the cosmos. I imparted the artistic side of life: a universe of practicing, teaching, and recording.

Jose had informed us that he was going to Paris on business the following Monday and wouldn’t be back on Board Amtrak 711 for two weeks. I felt of a twinge of disappointment because our table would be whittled down to two.

I departed the train at the Richmond station where I hopped over to Bart, going one stop to El Cerrito Del Norte. My studio, within walking distance, was about half way up into the El Cerrito Hills. Homes at the very top overlooked the Bay and Golden Gate Bridge. From my more modest studio, well below the peak, I still appreciated a breathtaking landscape as beautiful as a painting with hills and terraced homes.

Before I had officially started lessons in the early afternoon I always took a scenic, steep walk into these very same hills, and then wound my way down to the Ohlone walk way under Bart on my way to the El Cerrito Library. An hour later, after a stop at Subway for a veggie burger I would meander back to the studio for a lesson plan review.

My Bay area students were mostly kids at beginning and intermediate levels. The last lesson, ending at 9 p.m. was with a retired business professional who has an affinity for world wide travel. An eager learner she practiced intensely when she could, though her time at the piano was sparing.

The pieces I’d been teaching up north were Minuets and Sonatinas from the Classical era; a Baroque Rondeau, and some ragtime music by Scott Joplin. The beginners were journeying happily through their Primer Faber Piano Adventures learning the basic symbols and notation of music while the older students enjoyed the works of Bach, Rameau, Mozart, and Latour, a classical era composer.

When lessons were over well past 9 p.m. I had set my alarm clock for a Tuesday departure, regretting the trip back to Fresno where I would be greeted by stifling heat. The ride home would also feel longer without Jim and Jose, as companions. But there was always the chance I would run into someone to strike up a conversation with.

And it happened. As I sat in the dining car munching on a fruit and nut bar, I overheard a woman chatting about her self made “guitar” earrings. I soon learned that she had hand crafted her adornments from guitar picks, painted them and added some fancy attachments.

Before long, I began telling her about myself and the piano and she, in turn, shared her life story. The journey home was definitely quicker than expected.

Before I knew it, I was back in Fresno, with four students on the roster for the late afternoon. Since a few were preparing for an October 30th recital, I thought about you tubing performances as practice motivators. Kabalevky’s “Clowns,” would be a great shoot. A very colorful, short programmatic piece with a circus like backdrop, it had droll harmonies and appealing dissonances.

The next few weeks would be packed with rehearsals, which made life a nice, creative adventure.